The US government is giving out free wasps

čas přidán 11. 12. 2022
The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive pest. To help deal with its numbers, the Oregon Department of Agriculture is releasing its natural enemy: the tiny samurai wasp. There's a lot of work that goes into it. ▪ Thanks to all the team at the ODA, and to Chris Hedstrom for the macro footage.

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Komentáře

  • I'm focusing on just one project here to make the story clearer, but I should point out there are many different projects like this, working with many different species. (And to preempt the obvious question in the title: the wasps are not available to the general public!)

    • Are they safe for bees?

    • It's my taxpayer money, I want my FRICKING wasps!

    • @My Lady Casagrande I for one welcome our New Overlord

    • And here I was hoping to order some... oh well.

    • Dang! I'm over here in North Carolina and we have a crap ton of I presume that exact type of stink bug (I'm no etymologist) so they're so irritating. I was really hoping I might be able to get my hands on a couple and introduce him to our small scale farm.

  • “I’ve been working with them for a decade, and I’ve never been stung.” That’s exactly what someone who was being mind controlled by a parasitic wasp would say.

    • you probably could say that almost everywhere ^^

    • real

    • @Joshua Karr that's actually Cars by Gary Numen but >__>

    • So you also saw that fungal stem growing out the side of his head?

    • thanks for making my day :D

  • I absolutely love how good Tom Scott is at making videos that make you go "huh, neat". It's not earthshattering knowledge but it's just interesting enough

    • Which is way more valuable.

    • If you've dealt with stinkbugs before this IS earthshattering

    • @Albus, just Albus i can confirm, here in oregon we've had SO many stinkbugs these last few years it's definitely a problem haha. I had no clue this video was about here until they said Oregon, cool stuff!

    • Sometimes it has a potential to become something big, like in this video - it's a potential eco catastrophe.

  • By the way, just so folks know: there's a whole bunch of similar-looking stink bugs in the Oregon region (and I assume elsewhere), marmorated are the major pest ones. If you're in a position to consider control like this make sure you identify what you've got and whether it's an issue.

    • We have these in Indiana too. Saw one on my ceiling just last night

    • Big problem is WI, as one of our major crops are soybeans (soybeans help corn grow in central WI). They are pests with the stink but without the bite. Autumn brings flocks of them, clinging to the sides of buildings and flying in your face. I never thought I'd be thanking a wasp.

    • Canada B.C. here we had stink bugs so bad one year they couldn't paint our house because of how many where on our siding

    • Theyre called Shieldbugs in lreland, we have lots of different types and no problems with them.

  • Biologists have a special place in my heart. I remember at my graduation ceremony, we did it together with Biology and it was just one PhD after the other about the same fungus doing its thing. I also remember molecular biology and putting tiny quantities of things into things all day. Imagine having to study, feed and nurture those wasps for decades as your job and still have that sort of passion. Those guys must be both the most chill and most obsessed humans on Earth. Hats off to people doing that sort of work, you're truly amazing and without you, our planet would be a much worse place.

    • Yo fungi are super interesting tbh, and as a biology grad I appreciate that you appreciate us^^ When we see how little care we give to our planet I think it needs quite a lot more biologists!

    • am biologist, checks out. the chill part is mostly found in ecologists though, at least in my experience so far :D

    • I'm a molecular biology postdoc and "putting tiny quantities of things into things all day" is a frighteningly accurate description of my job.

    • Hey, thank you :) From a biologist, who's just starting their journey

  • The past two summers I've had wasps nesting in my stables, and each time I've hardly had any issues with horse flies - normally my horses get bitten really badly. Not sure if the wasps have been hunting the horse flies or scaring them off, but they're welcome to keep returning if I get the same results each year (also helps that they've never stung me)

    • @A G yes i dont have arachnophobia, some spiders were living with for months. They killed a LOT of nasty stuff, mosquitoes, flies and other bugs

    • @no1uno Clearly you don't have arachnophobia. Also the wolf spiders and brown recluses where I live will bite you and it is nasty. I don't mind the spiders outside but I'm not going to live with them.

    • @A G but spiders are quite good, they wouldnt bite you and they get rid of other bugs

    • Pest wasp species are predators of other bugs. Unlike bees who bring back pollen and make honey to feed their larvae, wasps and hornets are predators who feed their larvae other bugs. Even pest wasps are very beneficial as long as they don't nest in areas where they might sting you.

    • @Bern Apparently so and birds. It’s not sure if it’s true though as it’s never been seen (Sheep getting caught and actually dying.) to be done.

  • As a kid I loved raspberries. I was eating them from a bush in my grandma’s garden with both hands, but what I didn’t see was a stinkbug hiding on top of a berry. The taste lingered in my mouth for days, and I can never look at raspberries again the same way…

    • @Vidchemy Ants are tiny plus they mostly are acidic which doesn't affect the main taste of the berry too much which is also acidic. They still taste crap tho.

    • That's so travesty! I've accidentally eaten ants in figs and mulberry. The taste was like bug spray, but it didn't linger

    • It’s a bot, ignore it

    • Yum

  • It's crazy that British spelling is used in the subtitles when Tom is speaking, and American spelling when the researcher is speaking. What an effort.

    • it's almost as if they are two different languages (double sarcasm)

    • @N P Bro I have never heard the word "limey" until now. 😭

    • @0y1on water is wet

    • @Me h As a "Yank" I laughed.

    • @Eric R. Malice England is my city

  • As an Oregonian, this is total news to me - this was really fascinating; thank you!

    • @Nathan Rasmussen Same here I see a ton in my house.

    • Portland area here. They started coming into my home this fall, them and the dang Conifer seed bugs. Wish I could get some of those wasps.

    • Same in Columbia county. I see a dozen a day on my porch during summer.

    • I don't know what I expected the Oregon demonym to be, but I definitely didn't expect it to sound like a Star Trek species.

    • Same, I see stink bugs all the time out here in clackamas.

  • we had a huge issue with these stink bugs in the mountains of souther california destroying tree bark and eventually killing the tree, we used to call then bark beetles incorrectly not knowing what they actually where, it’s really cool to know that there are people working on resolving this issue!

    • I have bark beetles in my woods too. I'll have to try and catch some this spring and get them properly identified, and see if this is a solution.

    • There is actually a native genus of beetles called bark beetles as well, they’re one of the issues some conifer species are facing in the west! Really fascinating how the interplay between climate change, fire, and bark beetles are facilitating major damage to conifer forests.

  • I love how they’re breeding wasps to send across the country, but still breeding them in coffee cups labeled with post its and scotch tape 😂

    • Thats all you need sometimes, and sometimes all you are able to use

  • "Hello, I need some free Wasps please" What a time to be alive.

  • I really love it when you visit such labs and let us get a glimpse into other peoples work.

  • Thanks for dropping this during the holiday season, really helpful for those needing last-minute gift ideas

    • Oh no

    • Santa Claus has decided that a lump of coal isn't direct enough.

    • Send some my way. I live in the country and stink bugs are a nuisance.

    • 🤣

    • @Konstantin Khitrin As someone with multiple fish tanks, I'd be ecstatic if I received a box full of tiny wasps. Free fish food for a year!

  • My favourite trivia about parasitic wasps: It is said that for every type of beetle there is (and the naturalists of the 1800s tell us there are a great many) there exists a parasitic wasp that exclusively targets it. Some parasitic wasps are hyperparasites, that is they target other parasitic wasps. There is a tiny wasp that is smaller than an amoeba, with a reduced nervous system containing nuerons without nuclei.

  • This is fantastic work. As a child I found many of these stink bugs in West Sacramento, CA about 45 yrs ago. I'm sure they had been brought in via the Port of Sacramento. I have many house plants and know many people who use this type of pest control in their homes so as not to use pesticides. For most it works fantastically if they choose the correct predator. As a child my parents would release hundreds of ladybugs on our roses and garden plants for aphid control and it worked really well. I have a little jumping spider I let live in and around my plants for fungus gnat control.The work you are doing is invaluable. 😊🌱💚

    • I’m really glad people are still using methods like this. These days, we are too quick to reach for the sprayed chemicals

  • Glad you covered the concerns about introducing competitive species, lots of history of that going terribly in the past!

  • I live in Oregon, and I knew the brown marmorated stink bug was a huge issue (I see them everywhere), but I had no idea there was a possible solution.

    • @Kara R As a Northern Californian, I'd say there's a bit of hippie/surfer dude affectation thrown in (Sean Penn in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.) His vowels are a bit longer than is typical. It's used to indicate a relaxed attitude. Dr. Raggozino didn't strike me as someone who smokes pot every day, but I bet he hangs out with people that do. (No judgements involved, just a cultural observation to satisfy your curiosity--I also find regionalisms and subcultures fascinating.)

    • Many invasive/pest insects have viable solutions, and many of those solutions are some wacky overspecialized wasp. People go out of their way nuking pests with potent pesticides only for them to quickly adapt, when the solution is often as simple as fighting fire with fire (or in this case, bugs with bugs).

    • @Kara R yes it is an Oregonian accent, sometimes called the "newscaster" accent

    • @Persomnus Sorry, I meant Dr. Ragozzino.😆 I do know Tom Scott is British.

    • @Kara R no he's not from Oregon. Tom Scott is British Oregon speaks Pacific Northwest English which is very similar to Californian English in the cities. I speak it slightly strong bc I grew up in a small community, and ppl from other states often guess im from Nova Scotia.

  • I build cellphone towers and the last 3-5 years have been INSANE because of these stink bugs. When I open up a cabinet anywhere in the Midwest there are dozens, if not HUNDREDS, of them living in there. And somehow they ALWAYS find a way into my car when I’m parked on site. Another cool topic for a video would be the swarms of bees that form around antennas. You can be several feet in the air and have a cloud of 100 bees just buzzing around the antennas that dissipate as soon as you turn the equipment off.

  • I can't believe Tom is giving out 100k free wasps

    • @Tanapigeon nooooooo

    • @Paloma elegante now I'm changing it

    • But they all fit in a single jar.

    • Stink bugs have taken over my house (southeast US). I mean it's their house, I just live in it. How do I get government wasps?

  • Living in Oregon, these pest stinkbugs are by far the most common bug you will encounter. By far.

    • It's not just Oregon. In Ohio they are EVERYWHERE! I have a screened in deck, no bugs ever get in, except those damn stick bugs

  • Wasps are so helpful! My brothers had a tomato patch that was plagued by hornworms - they tried every pesticide in the book, then gave up. Within a few weeks, wasps had moved into our patch and happily rid us of the hornworms. Hadn't ever really noticed that kind of "pesticide by nature" before but it's an awesome concept. (Okay but seriously the one species of wasp that can go jump in a lake is the Texas Red Devil. OUCH.)

    • Some days when I'm weeding the wasps come over to see what the plants are screaming about.

  • I've made friends with wasps of many varieties, including the stinging kind. They have little interest in us and are generally kind unless they become contained unexpectedly. Most people I know who've been stung are people who spooked the wasp with ridiculous overreactions or who sat on one or swatted one.

  • I have long allowed mud daubers to exist in and around my garden. They get a little riled up when i'm mowing around the perimeter, but I've literally never been stung by them. Its my understanding that they like to prey on widow spiders, and those are a bit of an issue in my area from time to time. Mud daubers don't mess with you if you don't mess with them. They *can* sting, but usually choose not to do so unless defending the nest.

  • This was an amazing interview... just this past summer/fall we began being inundated with these stink bugs. Thank you to your team and Oregon Dept of Ag for putting this together!

  • "Taxpayer funded wasps" not a phrase I expected to hear, and a phrase I will use when telling people this information.

    • @Mark Zickefoose What do you mean??

    • It's even more unexpected than finding out that the Feds have a Strategic Helium Reserve.

    • in b4 irl dead rising

    • I mean hell of a way to describe billionaires but I can dig it

    • Undoubtedly there's a lot of wasted taxpayer money but this ain't one.

  • this is incredible. as an aspiring entomologist/environmental scientist, this kind of thing always gets my interest and its so cool that this is possible

  • it's amazing to find people appreciating wasps like they deserve. they're such sweet creatures. you just have to handle them as you would a snake- gently and without fear. they'll let you pick them up and feed them if you're careful enough. and the stings don't hurt that badly. unless you're allergic, wasps don't pose any risk to you or others.

  • I live in Oregon. These stink bugs are everywhere. A constant presence on my windowsill. I’m glad work is being done to control them.

  • You should probably make a follow up video on how rabbits were introduced to Australia for hunting, but went out of control so people introduced cats which themselves went out of control

  • I remember in Highschool, around 2010 Maryland was inundated with stink bugs. I went from never ever seeing one to suddenly seeing thousands. They are..infuriating creatures.

  • In time I've realized one of the big things that makes Tom's videos so enjoyable is that, not only does he go out of his way to help people learn more about these otherwise unknown or obscure jobs/creations/facts about the world, but he also takes the time to focus on the workers and designers that helped make it happen. It is so nice to see how he focuses on the human components behind everything; being able to see interviews with the very people who make these things work really makes the subject matter feel that much more valuable. There's something so starkly different between a voiceover video of someone explaining what is going on with generic stock images or videos, versus seeing Tom actually go to each location and talk to the workers themselves about what goes down. It no longer feels like just some fun factoid; it really emphasizes that there are workers actively keeping something like this going.

    • It's no coincidence that Tom Scott, SmarterEveryDay, and Dirty Jobs have become big names in educational programs. These guys have the humility to "stay in their lane" as the educational presenter and leave the expert stuff to the experts when appropriate. The result is a much richer educational program and the viewer doesn't feel like they're being talked down to.

    • Agreed 100%

    • Yes he is quite overtly hardcore about that

    • I liked this before even reading it! And glad to say after reading it I agree whole heartily😊

    • He doesn't go out of his way for this, it IS his way 😂

  • I hate these stink bugs. I live in Washington state, and they’re all over the place. Good to know that efforts are being made to suppress them!

  • Tom, you should look at biodiversity and biosecurity in New Zealand, Aotearoa. We are often leading the world when it comes to things like this, we are often moving species around the country to combat pests and provide other benefits. We are currently sending dung beetles all over the country to help regenerate the soil that we are damaging with livestock grazing. We sell a lot of ladybugs too, for aphid control.

  • I love the topics that Tom come up with.... things we would never think to look up ourselves unless we were scientists. 👍😎

  • It's interesting. I recognize those stinkbugs on sight immediately. Not only have they sort of been around in the background my whole life, I'm living on a college campus that, due to chronic low budgets, never installed screens in its dorm windows. And those stinkbugs are by far and away the most common unwanted guest that will come in the window. The mosquitoes may be more annoying, but they're also surprisingly uncommon. And then there are also these little "fruit flies" infesting the place that I can't help but wonder about now. There's no way I'll ever be able to tell them apart from other similarly sized species, even if I did get one under a microscope. But I can't help wondering whether I should regret the fruit fly traps I've seen set up, or the fact that once we learned they'll frequently drown in small quantities of standing water my roommates and I started leaving a few cups or jars of water for them to drown in around the place...

    • My fridge door wasn't closed totally when I left for a break one time in college. Shut off and everything rotted inside, my house looked like a person had died and decomposed inside or something. It was horrifying.

    • You'll normally only get fruit flies if you don't take out the trash or have something rotting in your home...........

  • Well, I wasn't expecting to see a video on this variety of stink bug today. I love these little fellows, they're just so derpy. If I had to pick an insect to liken to the cultural perception of the dodo, these are the one. I have witnessed so many of them repeatedly flying into walls to the point of both losing limbs, and just dying from the repeated impacts... It doesn't help that they're extremely uncoordinated when it comes to flying... Also, they seem to fear absolutely nothing.

    • You sure you're not thinking of the conifer seed bugs? Those guys are clumsy loud flyers. I've only seen the marmorated ones skulk around. Had too many of both come inside this fall.

  • Can we please take a moment to appreciate Tom's showmanship with title and thumbnail? It's a fine balance to create intrigue without being fatuous clickbait, but Tom has a great track record of being attention-grabbing and a bit goofy without being misleading. Today's was an excellent specimen.

  • An amazing informational yet concise video as always, well done Tom.

  • Thanks for this video! I live in Oregon and I have reached out to the researchers to see if we can get wasps. There were thousands of BMSB here this past summer.

  • this is my favorite video you've made so far-- it's really fascinating to hear an expert talk about this sort of thing, and you include plenty of details that answer a lot of the questions that'll inevitably crop up when you title a video like this. brilliant work!

  • Nugget wasps! As an insect photographer I know calls tiny wasps like these ones here haha. I’m glad you made a video that helps to destigmatize wasps because people just blindly hate them all without knowing more about how important they are to ecosystems.

  • I think I can safely say that releasing a genus of wasps that lay their eggs in the bodies of bugs, where the larvae will hatch inside the living bodies of these bugs and start to devour their internal organs one-by-one, is a good example of how the 'natural' way is not always the nicest.

    • @peter g Yes we apply human criteria to things in nature. obviously, thats not what i meant

    • @no1uno: expand your mind. something is "nice" only if somebody invents criteria of "niceness" - these criteria don't exist in nature; we make them up.

    • @peter g its not unnatural, plenty nice things in nature

    • It's nice for the wasps. They like their meat as fresh as possible I guess.

  • Very cool. I just moved to the PNW and I noticed how many more of those stink bugs I'm running into that where I used to live. Nice to know people care and are working on things like these.

  • Programs like this need to be funded far more than they are. I am sure that guy will tell you how they worry about funding every year and how their little program could be cut at a moments notice.

  • Biocontrol is so awesome! As an environmental science student, thank you so much for covering this important topic!

  • I remember hearing about someone looking into this idea at a meeting years ago and wondered what became of it. Thanks Tom!

  • I just watched your video about the US government giving out free wasps, and I must say that I was really impressed by the information you provided. Your research on the topic was thorough and your presentation was engaging and informative. I learned a lot about the role that these wasps play in pest control and how they can benefit both the environment and agriculture. Great job on the video! - ChatGPT

  • Everybody : Government services are always terrible and unpleasant. Government: Would you like some wasps?

    • LMAO

    • @whitewolf262 thank you for your service. Without selfless people like you I wouldn't be able to watch these great videos. Thank you.

    • @Mme. Veronica What do you mean "government funded mail"? In the US, The Postal Service receives no direct taxpayer funds. It relies on revenues from stamps and other service fees.

    • Say what you want, but the USCSB puts out some high quality videos, they can use my tax dollars any day.

  • This is one of the most interesting videos you have made to date. Outstanding work Tom!

  • I see those stink bugs all the time! Glad to see that they're being dealt with

  • Tom never ceases to amazes me by dropping random videos of random topics.

  • Every spring and fall, these stink bugs just kinda invade my apartment, but I've just kinda gotten used to them. Cool to know that eventually they will get under control.

  • Oh my God. I've been wanting to know what that friendly little stink bug was since childhood! I love randomly being taught things that I wanted to know that wasn't actually the purpose of the lesson/video/talk/lecture. I love in Las Vegas and these things are even out here.

  • I'm sure others have pointed out, this isn't the "US Government" it's the "Oregon Government". The federal government is not a part of this at all. This is funded by the residents of Oregon.

    • @Acc_Expired We're going in circles here. You have your understanding of the term and make no concessions. I have my understanding of the term, which apparently seems to align with Tom's understanding of it. No point spinning around and talking to walls for either of us. Have a nice day, friend.

    • @IceMetalPunk A member of the smith family is "a smith" not "the smiths". A member of the united states is "a state" not "the united states". The government of a member of the united states is "a state government" not "the united states government". This is extremely easy. If not for the other people on this thread I would have already assumed you were just baiting.

    • @Acc_Expired So in your opinion, members of the Smith family are not Smiths? Are they Joneses, then?

    • @IceMetalPunk really? You would say the smiths are on vacation if only one of them is out of town? I dont think there is any point in continuing this discussion then.

    • @Acc_Expired I didn't ask whether Oregon has its own government. I asked what country's government Oregon's belongs to. Unless you're claiming they are their own country? All your examples are using "US government" as a synonym for "federal government", but my point is that they are not equivalent terms. When the US *federal* government shuts down, the US state governments can continue to allocate funds. If the entire US government shut down, they could not. By the way, in your analogy, it is in fact perfectly valid to say "the Smiths are on vacation". In your analogy, Smith = US, family = federal.

  • This was genuinely interesting, and something I had never heard of before. Tom Scott has done it again. Phenomenal.

  • That's neat. I live in Washington, just across the river from Oregon, and the stink bugs are getting worse every year. I was lucky enough to keep them outside for the duration of this summer!

  • This was an absolutely fantastic video, and I hope you enjoyed visiting my home state!

  • I remember when the population of stinkbugs exploded in my part of Oregon. One year you never saw them and the next there was one inside the house nearly every day. This is really cool!

  • Awesome to see you in my home state Tom! Interesting topic and excellent as always.

  • Finally free food!!! Mmmmm crunchy

    • @LiterallyJustSoap omg its future bestselling authour mr logan soap

    • can't believe a future pharmacist is out here munching on wasps :(

    • R/cursedcomments

    • 💀

    • Can you save some for me too?

  • I never thought I'd be so excited to see you in my home state! I hope you enjoyed your time there Tom!

  • I love love love wasps; I'm always glad to see something that talks about them positively, because wasps are no where near as scary as people think. Also I really wish I could get some free wasps, myself.

  • "I've worked with this wasp for over a decade." Well, if you can vouch for him, I trust you.

  • This was very interesting. I had no idea that a species of wasp was so tiny.

  • You finally visited my home state! Those stink bugs are nasty. My yard gets overrun by them every year. When they get really bad, I usually use a leaf blower to round them up in the driveway and torch them. Some people use pesticides, but those can kill bees and everything else that gets in the way.

  • They've somewhat recently started releasing imported wasps to try to control the emerald ash borer beetle, which is very depressingly killing over 99% of the ash trees in northeastern North America. Might make a good follow-up video.

    • @Gavin Garey seed bugs are only a big issue in coniferous plantations

    • @Gavin Garey we have to kill it with fire

    • I live in Idaho I was wondering if these wasps would kill the western conifer seed bug?

    • @Cats J not kidding I couldn’t tell if you were speaking literally or figuratively 🙃

  • As someone who taught parasitology, I absolutely loved this.

  • Your videos are always very interesting! Thank you for your work!

  • This is amazingly informative and I learned something I didn't know. We have brown marmorated stink bugs around us in Illinois, only see them when the seasons change in the house. I always scoop them up and let them go because being a "stink bug" I was taught not to crush them to kill them. How can we get some of those wasps to Chicagoland?

  • Great story - more like this, please!

  • This was super interesting! Also that part about how to get around the problem of the ethics of introducing a new species - well it came there anyway...

  • Those stinkbugs are extremely prevalent here on the east coast of the US. Japanese beetles are the other really bad pest. But the stinkbugs seem to like human dwellings which really really sucks

    • Same here in Iowa

    • @Jordan Bradford They are hanging out on/around your door as the exterior of the house is warmer than the dead leaves. When you go in/out of the door, they take the opportunity to chase the warmth. You don't notice them because you've got other things going on when you're entering/leaving a house.

    • @CircleThinker They do have a rather repulsing smell - when damaged, not sure if they also use it defensively.

    • @AddE , my chickens thank you for that idea!

    • You can do a number on japanese beetles by taking the lure out of a bug bag and putting it at the top of a pvc pipe, then putting the bottom of the pvc pipe in a chicken yard.

  • Hats off to the editor, the title and thumbnail combo had me laughing for 5 minutes straight

  • That's cool. I've seen those little wasps or ones like them and haven't seen stink bugs very much since I was a kid. Have you done one on the blue green metallic looking wasps. They are small but insanely tough. I've heard they turn roaches into zombies that they lead into their burrows and lay eggs on.

  • I’m constantly catching the stink bugs in my house. Thank you for the info.

  • At this point I've been bit by almost as many of those brown stink bugs as I have been stung by wasps. Had one of those stinkbugs hitch a ride home just biting my neck. I thought I'd gotten a thorn or something in my neck but I was driving so I couldn't deal with it. Not a good time. edit: actually I might have the stink bug mixed up with another similar-looking beetle that's a bit rounder; just went through my photos to see what evil bastard bit me that time i'm thinking of

    • @Kevin James usually you can’t feel a tick biting you because of the numbing their saliva does, I’ve been bit several times didn’t feel a thing but noticed them physically attached and ended up with Lyme disease which caused more pain/issues than the bite

    • @Kevin James It was much more like a beetle. I think at the time it happened I had a friend who knows agriculture tell me what it was with moderate confidence (I really couldn't get a good photo of it even tho it was as big as my thumb). Certainly not a tick.

    • Was it a tick?

  • As a fellow Oregonian, I can confirm that stink bugs are the worst

  • Tom mentioned not knowing wasps could be that small, but there's quite a few smaller ones as well. The smallest insect is another parasitoid wasp species that can be as small as 140μm, smaller than some single celled organisms. Wasps can be surprisingly tiny!

    • @Gray Kruse while distinctly NOT organisms, birds' eggs (and all other eggs) are also a single cell. think about an ostrich egg!

    • @Gray Kruse Valonia ventricosa is a great example, their ability to function may be down to their multiple nuclei.

    • That's miniscule. And it has a BRAIN in there. Wild.

    • @Kyle That is fascinating. I'm kind of shocked that a single cell can get that big and still function properly, considering the number of cells that would be packed into a section of a human body that size

  • Interesting. We hope to see a follow up after the wasp as operated in general population.

  • Tom, very cool!! I live in Oregon and had recently heard about Samari Wasps. I also recently saw a stink bug in my front yard to see if I need to get some wasps. Hope you enjoyed your visit here.

  • Those stink bugs are literally the most miserable frustrating part of my day 🙄 I live in Oregon and they get into my home to hibernate. They smell horrendous and I find them in everything!

  • Really wish I could get these just for my house and property. Stinks bugs (and box elder beetles) are the bane of my existence!

  • I live every single video of Tom. He always have someting interesting, curious, or inspiring to share.

  • A taxpayer-funded Wasp Chamber is not something I expected to learn about today, but here we are

    • I believe a "taxpayer-funded WASP chamber" is another way of saying "protestant church" ⛪️

    • Government approved subscriber milestone wasp giveaway

  • I’m always skeptical about these sorts of things. We try and use nature to counter nature, and we end up dramatically changing the ecosystem for decades. I hope this isn’t a cause of regret one day.

    • That's why they carefully thought out if they were gonna release the wasps or not, trying to figure out if they targeted any native species, or any other ecological effects it could have. But then they showed up anyway.

  • Thank you _Tom_ and *_Max_* - This was very fascinating to watch! Thx

  • I live in Oregon and these stink bugs have become a major problem at my house. I haven’t found anywhere online that says they’re giving out free wasps here

  • Last summer the left side of my house (the one that gets the most sun during the summer time) was completely covered in these things. There were THOUSANDS of them.

  • Hey, Oregon! Always nice to see my home state show up in interesting videos.

  • Bro. I live in Oregon and those stink bugs are absolutely everywhere and get into everything. It’s a massive problem

    • Same

    • It’s not just Oregon. It’s on the east coast as well.

    • Yes, but did you know Tom Scott was in Oregon? I didn't spot him!

    • Washington here, and I see them from time to time

    • Gotta get your government mandated daily dose of wasp

  • honestly this is the kind of thing that makes me proud to be human. the history and ingenuity behind these techniques and facilities is amazing. i also really appreciate that the wasps are free for whoever needs them. problems were identified, solutions were made and distributed to all for free. good stuff

  • I would love to get some for my vegetable garden. I love wasps. They are a perfect example of 'enemy of my enemy is my friend'.

  • Not sure if you need any video ideas while your here in Oregon but the Newport Jetty and the effects on its accompanying beaches might be an interesting topic. Great video as always!

  • Okay that was a nice one. I’ve always had a bad impression for wasps and this one certainly clears a lot of my misunderstanding for them.

  • One of my favorite wasps is the hatchet wasp that poses zero threat to humans but lays its eggs in roaches. Great little guys to have around.

  • Parasitic aphid wasps have been my go-to for greenhouse aphid control for years. Same with the humble ladybug, they’re voracious aphid eaters.

  • People are generally way too fearful of wasps in a general sense. Wasps are unlikely to sting you unless you actively mess with em. There's a garbage bin that's full of soda cans next to the picnic table outside my work place and there's tons of wasps in the summer flying around it. I've slapped away inordinate amounts of them every year and I've not been stung sitting there once.

    • @J.D. you got me, I'm actually a wasp in disguise on the internet

    • I think it's the location too that determines the aggressiveness

  • Never thought we'd get Tom Scott to the lovely state of Oregon for a video. Never thought the ODA would be breeding wasps either though... Hope Oregon treated you nicely!

  • Whenever I see videos on wasps it's always about the "biggest and scariest" ones, so I had no idea they could be so tiny :D